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Site Admin
 21 Oct 20, 15:38
Foreword; this is not my work, but that of one of the members in the Discord server for The Race For Terra. Blank has very kindly let me post it here for everyone but the credit is entirely his. =]



Intro and Tools

This is a quick and simple tutorial for modelling battle damage on your models. The idea behind the effect is to create realistic looking damage where a bolter round failed to penetrate ceramite armour and instead exploded on its surface creating a small impact crater from the resulting stress wave. For modelling this technique you will need:
A sharp scalpel blade
2 different sized drill bits (I used 1mm and 2mm)
Optionally you can use files to clean up or to create the asymmetrical imperfections

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Step 1

First take your smaller drill and eyeball the right spot for the damage. I used 1 mm drill as that is what I use to drill my bolter barrels. Drill roughly 1-2mm into the model so that you get a nice round crater with the tip of the drill.

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Step 2

Now follow up with a larger drill bit to make the actual impact crater. I used a 2mm drill bit here. Drill a shallower hole using the previous one as a guide. This is achieved by carefully twisting the tip of the drill onto the existing hole on the model.

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Step 3

Finally take your scalpel and carefully cut a couple of small dents onto the edges of the crater. Make sure you randomize their size and location for each impact to sell a more natural looking effect.

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Finished!

Here is the final result. By drilling 2 separate holes onto the model the crater has a visible distinction between where the round landed and the resulting impact. Imperfections aka dents and chips on the edges break the symmetrical form and create a more natural looking effect.

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Element Games - Wargaming Webstore
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Full Member
 22 Oct 20, 00:13
Really cool tutorial. I'm definitely going to have to try this.
How do the results compare to dremel results?
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Full Member
 24 Oct 20, 03:14
Neat tutorial! Using a larger drill bit instead of carving around with a sharpened sculpting tool or modelling knife is a good idea. The denting irregularities around the edges are a must, I've done this on some 40k stuff in the past and it makes all the difference.
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Site Admin
 25 Oct 20, 22:56
@James - I'm not sure I would want to use a rotary took for this! The damage is shallow enough that I would be worried that a tiny slip or slightly too much pressure would take you too far.

@Karak Norn Clansman - in the past I've never thought to use a larger drill bit instead of a blade, but now that I've seen it it's glaringly obvious!
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Full Member
 25 Oct 20, 23:00
Is there any good dremel tutorials or guides specific for minis that your aware of?
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Site Admin
 26 Oct 20, 13:21
More passing references that I've seen all over the place.
I know that plenty use them for working with larger resin parts, but my needs are more metal based - even just filing down the remains of slotta tabs ruins your files really quick. When it comes to actually cutting through metal I would have no chance!
Element Games - Wargaming Webstore